How does the form of the interactive object affect the visiting experience?

The experience with tangible interaction is changed by the form of the object we interact with. In a study carried out on the trenches of WWI, we experimented with changing […]

The experience with tangible interaction is changed by the form of the object we interact with. In a study carried out on the trenches of WWI, we experimented with changing the object the visitors hold, a book vs. a belt. In the archeological site of the WWI trenches and fortified camp in the Italian Alps, we embedded stories in place that are played as an automatic response to the visitor’s movement. Four different stories are available and visitors can listen to many stories in the same place by changing the position of a bookmark on the book or by placing another card in the belt. The result of the evaluation showed the book as a cultural artefact carried a meaning that affected the visitors’ expectations. The belt, while being still very simple to use, was not a familiar and culturally charged object and therefore was a better design for the specific place.

The study can be retrieved from the Sheffield Hallam University repository

Here below is a clip from the evaluation that shows the interaction in place.

Recordings of the belt and the book in the trenches of Nagia’ Grom (Trento, Italy)

Two short clips that show how the belt and the book work.

How the interactive belt works.
How the interactive book works.